Yachting traditions triumph in Monaco!

14th Monaco Classic Week – La Belle Classe

11-15 September 2019


Yachting traditions triumph in Monaco!

 

 

  • Puritan wins Monaco Classic Week Trophy
  • Renaissance of Ester recognised
  • The big schooners put on a show
  • 12-foot Dinghies an Italian affaire
  • Elena of London, Mariska, Chips, Meerblick Fun 1857, Cippino II shine

 

The 14th Monaco Classic Week culminated in style today with the prize-giving ceremony attended by HSH Prince Albert II.

A biennial event organised by the Yacht Club de Monaco since 1994, it is a stunning celebration of the yachting lifestyle that dates back over generations, putting the spotlight on gleaming hulls and beautiful boats, be they sailing or motor.

 

It is not just about competition, but naval etiquette done with panache by the Club in partnership with Rolex and Credit Suisse. The Monaco Classic Week Trophy, awarded to the most elegant and best restored yacht, this year went to the majestic Puritan (1930), with the 2019 La Belle Classe Restoration Prize presented to the miraculous Swedish gaff Ester back from the dead after 75 years 52m down on the seabed.

 

More than 100 classic yachts, including seven of the big schooners from the International Schooner Association were in the YCM Marina. Some 800 sailors, owners and skippers from 26 countries put on a show reviving a bygone era, with the focus on America and the glory years when American sailing and motor boats dominated the seas for speed. All promise to return for the next edition from 15-19 September 2021.

 

Ode to America

The focus was on America and the glory years of the last century when American sailing and also motorboats dominated the seas thanks to big names like Nathanael Herreshoff and John Alden, not to mention the iconic motorboats of Chris Craft. Also present, were yacht clubs steeped in history, like the Manhattan Yacht Club invited to sail on French Kiss, as a nod to its winning yacht in the 1987 America’s Cup, and the Nantucket Yacht Club whose members were on Comet (1946). An extra special guest in keeping with the theme was the SS Delphine, the largest steam-boat still sailing, built by the Dodge family, whose elegance and authenticity were admired by all her passed by.

 

Among newcomers to Monaco Classic Week: Atlantic (66m), the famous New York Yacht Club schooner which in 1905 set the record for an Atlantic crossing of 12 days 4 hours 1 minute 19 seconds. It was not until 1st August 1980 that a Eric Tabarly beat that time on this 2,925 mile course

 

 

Puritan the big winner of Monaco Classic Week Trophy

The impressive John Alden design schooner Puritan (1930) was the big winner of Monaco Classic Week, taking account of the deliberations from the Elegance and La Belle Classe Restoration juries, and succeeds Viola, the 1908 Fife design which won the 2017 edition. The purity of her lines and balanced volumes, combined with meticulous maintenance of a sailing yacht faithful to the original, won over the Elegance jury led by HRH Princess Beatriz de Orleans-Bourbon, supported by among others HRH Princess Camilla de Bourbon des Deux Siciles, the marine painter Marc Berthier and yachting experts and historians.

 

Ester wins La Belle Restoration Prize

It will be no surprise to many to hear that the pretty Swedish gaff cutter Ester won the La Belle Classe Restoration prize given the attention to detail paid to her restoration and incredible history.

It was in 1901 that Gunnar Hellgren was given the task to design a sailing yacht capable of winning the Tivoli Cup. The result was an innovative yet supremely elegant boat which for a decade dominated the podiums, hailed by many as the most beautiful sailing yacht in the world. Ester disappeared off the radar after 1915 not reappearing until 1935. She shone again in Ulvoen in 1937, before a fire broke out on board at the end of 1937. Seriously damaged, she was being towed to Ornskoldsvik when she sank off Normanön. It was not until 2012 that another Swede, Per Hellgren, finally managed to locate the wreck using sonar. She was raised in 2016 which marked the start of an incredible restoration story, the results of which were admired by all.

“Back in 2012 I was thinking how thrilling it would be to bring Ester to Monaco Classic Week. Seven years later that dream became a reality,” said an emotional Bo Ericsson, one of the boat’s owners at the prize-giving. “We put together the cream of international technicians, for the hull, frames, rigging, sails, etc. Of course, much of the boat has been rebuilt with Swedish pine and spruce. But thanks to the very accurate documents we found in Sweden, we were able to follow to the letter the details of the original construction. It has been an amazing adventure. The end result has exceeded even our craziest expectations.”

The Elegance Prize for motorboats was awarded to Miss Nancy while the gaff cutter Oriole (1905) designed by Herreshoff was the winner in the sailing yachts category. The Jury Special Prize this year went to the Mylne-design Bermudian yawl Mariella (1938), as they were totally won over by the personality and passion of its owner Carlo Falcone.

12-foot Dinghy class an Italian affair

The International 12-foot Dinghy Class, of which the fleet numbers 400 today, saw a clean sweep by the Italians. Aldo Samele on his Canarino Feroce emerged the winner ahead of compatriots Vito Moschioni (Claudia) and Federico Pilo Pais (Blu Amnesia).

 

 

 

In the vintage gaff group the main rivalry was between the Burgess design Chips (1913) and the Fife cutter Viola (1908), a duel won by Chips, with Viola in 2nd and Oriole in 3rd.

In the vintage Marconi, the Frers design Cippino II belonging to Daniel Sieleki, Vice Commodore at the Yacht Club Punta del Este, Uruguay, emerged the winner. The two Olin Stephens designs, Skylark of 1937 and Blitzen (1938), completed the trio on the podium.

Out of the 18 boats in the classic Marconi fleet, Meerblick Fun (1957) took 1st place ahead of Resolute Salmon (1975) and Encounter (Frers 1976).

The big schooner Elena of London reigned supreme in the spectacular group of Big Boats, ahead of the Mylne-design Naema and gaff cutter Moonbeam of Fife to win the Magnum Trophy.

The Metric Classes were also putting on a show, with Mecara in the 6M, Mirabella in the 8M and the 15M IR Mariska winning in their respective classes.


It happened at Monaco Classic Week

Franck Cammas, skipper of the Ultim trimaran Gitana 17, was on a stopover in Monaco. “I am naturally aware of boats’ aesthetics. Sailing on these classic boats is magical, but obviously not because of the speed but other sensations, even their very particular smell. When you have a taste for the sea, beauty is important. Technically, when we are hesitating on choices, we opt for the most beautiful, and generally that works out. A lovely boat is a quick boat! And vice-versa a boat that is fast becomes beautiful. Aesthetics are less important today in boat development, but we must never forget our traditions. I’m from Aix originally and I always love coming back to the south. Monaco has a solid regatta tradition, with the Primo Cup which I competed in some time ago.”

 

Back story of the America’s Cup in the early 20th century

Noëlle Duck and William Collier had put together an original exhibition shedding more light on George Lennox Watson, the unlucky Scottish naval architect who lost the Brits four America’s Cup campaigns at the turn of the last century. Eight double-sided panels along the quay in front of the Clubhouse gave a hint of the titanic, sometimes desperate efforts made by this great yacht designer to out-compete his adversaries like the legendary Nathanael Herreshoff and Edward Burgess. Noëlle Duck was given access to the G.L. Watson & Co archives to illustrate this revealing exhibition. It seems industrial espionage was already established, as Watson arranged to get hold of photos to see the hull shapes and volumes of the opponent’s boats while still in the yard.  It was also a treat for yacht enthusiasts to see these shots taken 120 years ago, many of them revealed for the first time.

 

Press contact: Yacht Club de Monaco – Tel: +377 93 10 64 09 – Email: presse@ycm.org

Copyright-free photos and video footage available on request

 

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14th Monaco Classic Week kicks off in style!

14th Monaco Classic Week kicks off in style!

73 of the most beautiful classic yachts

The art of life at sea sailing and motor

Ashore and on the sea

 

 

 

Wednesday 11th September 2019 – Serenaded by French naval military band – Musique des Equipage de la Flotte – the tone was set for the 14th Monaco Classic Week which celebrated American-Monegasque friendship at the end of a sunny day that saw most of the classic yachts out on the water off Cap d’Ail. Until Sunday the YCM Marina and Monaco’s Port Hercule plays host to some of the world’s most beautiful yachts, the throaty roar of classic motorboats following in the wake of these gaff riggers and Marconi sloops, not to mention a whole fleet of 12-foot Dinghies, an Olympic class in 1920, and full range of Metric Classes.

 

 

Gleaming brass and precious wood – 130 boats to admire on the quays and on the water

Monaco Classic Week is the only event of its kind to invite both classic sailing and motor boats, with nearly 130 boats in all, including 73 sailing yachts and Rivas and Chris Craft boats. All are here to revive the famous “Art de Vivre la Mer” spirit of friendship that has existed for over a century from the Mediterranean shores to the North Atlantic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manhattan Yacht Club and the French Kiss

A touch of history, where the Manhattan Yacht Club, owner in 1987 of America 2, the yacht that was beaten by the French in the quarter final of the America’s Cup in Fremantle, Australia, wanted to sail in Monaco on the winning 12M IR French Kiss, with Marc Pajot at the helm. Michael Fortenbaugh, Vice-Commodore of the Manhattan Yacht Club, is delighted by this cultural exchange in Monaco which in his own words “has the most beautiful yacht club in the world”.

 

Note that the Metric Classes built after the 1906 International Rating (IR) was introduced are here in force: 6M, 8M, 12M and of course the 15M which includes the YCM’s emblematic Tuiga, celebrating her 110th anniversary this year. The 12M class will be represented by La Spina, a masterpiece of Italian design, and French Kiss, just out of the yard after some restoration work.

 

And steam also!

Another icon, SS Delphine (1921), the 79m steam-boat built for the wife of automobile magnate Horace E. Dodge, makes a welcome return. It was aboard this beauty that three world leaders, Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill, negotiated at least part of the 1945 Yalta Agreement.

The 79m SS Delphine is a steam-boat built in 1921 for Horace Dodge, co-founder of the famous Dodge car brand. Launched in 1921 and named after Horace Dodge’s daughter, of all the big steam-boats built between 1893 and 1930 SS Delphine is the only one still in service in her original configuration including two steam engines.

In 1926, SS Delphine caught fire and sank in New York, but was recovered and restored in New York. During World War Two, the vessel was requisitioned by the US Navy in 1942 and renamed USS Dauntless, serving as the flagship for Admiral Ernest J. King, Commander in Chief of Naval Operations.

 

Schooner of the Year Trophy Act 2!

The International Schooner Association has chosen Monaco, after Capri, for the second stage of its all-new Schooner Cup Series. A dozen schooners, including Invader (1905), Puritan (1930) and Elena of London 2009 (1910 replica) are here to compete in the Schooner of the Year Trophy. Mariette, (Herreshoff 1915) was the winner in Capri ahead of Naema, the 2006 spirit of Mylne now determined to win this Act 2 in Monaco.

 

 

Monaco Classic Week Village open to the public

Located on Quai de l’Hirondelle in the heart of the YCM Marina, the Monaco Classic Week village is open to all from 9.00am to 9.00pm. Some 20 exhibitors are all linked to classic yachts: boatyards, craftsmen, marine painters, sculptors and photographers. For front row seats, YCM members can follow the racing from the pool area (Deck 2) and the Regatta Deck (Deck 6).

 

 

Tomorrow: Chefs aboard!

In keeping with the Club’s Art de Vivre la Mer philosophy, the Chefs competition is open to crew members (professional chefs or not) from all types of boat, an opportunity to demonstrate their creativity to produce dishes from a set number of ingredients paired with champagne. The dishes must be prepared on board and then presented on the quay to a jury of top chefs.

 

Provisional programme (subject to change)

 

Thursday 12th September

9.00am-6.00pm           Inspection of yachts by “La Belle Classe Restoration” Jury

9.00am-10.00am         Chefs Competition (distribution of ingredients on the quays)

11.00am                         Metric Class races (6 M IR/ 8 M IR/ 12 M IR/ 15 M – IR)

11.00am                         Classic yacht races (CIM rating)

11.00am                         Regularity challenge for motorboats

12.30pm                        Picnic at sea for motorboats

5.00pm-7.00pm         Chefs Competition (presentation of dishes on the quays)

Friday 13th September

9.00am-6.00pm         Inspection of yachts by “La Belle Classe Restoration” Jury

11.00am                       Metric Classes and 12’ Dinghy class races

11.00am                       Classic yacht races (CIM rating)

11.00am                       Manoeuvrability challenge for motorboats

Saturday 14th September 

9.00am-6.00pm        Inspection of yachts by “La Belle Classe“ Jury

10.00am                      Elegance parade for Classic yacht

11.00am                      Metric Classes and 12’ Dinghy class races

11.00am                      Classic yacht races (CIM rating)

2.30pm                       Elegance parade for motorboats and classic yachts

Sunday 15th September

12 noon                      Prize-giving (by invitation)

 

Press contact: Yacht Club de Monaco

Tel: +377 93 10 64 09 – Email: presse@ycm.org

Copyright-free photos and video footage available on request

Limited spaces on press boats with accreditation and by reservation

 

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Tribute to American yachts which dominated the international stage from 1851 to 1973

14th Monaco Classic Week – La Belle Classe : Stars and Stripes forever!

For this edition of the biennial Monaco Classic Week, the Yacht Club de Monaco is taking on an American accent, opening the meeting with a rendition of the famous Sousa march, ‘Stars & Stripes forever’ performed by naval military band, Musique des Equipage de la Flotte.

This is the only classic boat gathering which invites both sailing and motor boats, with some 130 registered. They include 74 classic and Metric Class sailing yachts, as well as 30 motorboats, represented by those symbols of the Mediterranean, the Rivas, and for the USA a fleet of the Chris Craft icons of American lakes.

 

It will be the first time that Atlantic 2010 (replica of the 1903 three-mast schooner on which Charlie Barr in 1905 set the best time for an Atlantic crossing) will be in the Principality. Another icon, SS Delphine (1921), the 79m steam-boat built for the wife of automobile magnate Horace E. Dodge, makes a welcome return. It was aboard this beauty that three world leaders, Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill, negotiated at least part of the 1945 Yalta Agreement.

 

 

‘BORN IN THE USA’ 

 

In Port Hercule, on the quays and in the Clubhouse, the YCM celebrates American yachting, those East Coast heroes on New York Yacht Club territory whose members helped write this incredible chapter in yachting history. Through their creations, we will find its designers, the likes of Starling Burgess, Nat. Herreshoff and John G. Alden, not to mention their prolific prestigious successors, Olin Stephens and his accomplice Roderick Sparkman, and Dick Carter whose clients had names like Vanderbilt, Rockfeller, Pierpont Morgan, Gorbes and John Kennedy.

 

More than a past-time, yachting combines creativity, industry and high-level competition, but also economic rivalry. What more effective and subtle way to conquer the American market, better than with tea or a disposable pen, thought the yet to be ennobled Thomas Lipton and then nearly a century later ballpoint producer Marcel Bich.

It was with American gigantism that the Yankees developed yachting to its highest level to beat the English on their own turf in Cowes, in front of Queen Victoria one day in June 1851. The vanquished wanted revenge, the winners agreed to host them on their waters, and the challenge was named after the victorious 1851 schooner, America, the replica of which will be moored in the YCM Marina.

Initially inspired by the big Maine fishing schooners, these designers were quick to innovate when faced with an onslaught of beautiful British yachts designed by Watson, Fife, Mylne and co. At the same time that NYYC members were building ever larger one-design classes, up to 70-foot for racing amongst themselves, others less wealthy but just as passionate were going for the Atlantic record in the Fastnet race to hear their anthem on the podium. And they were building them solid. The 20-plus out of 70 sailing boats that will be here at Monaco Classic Week will show they had lost none of their flair: Oriole (NY 30, 1905), Chips (P-Class, 1013), Rabbit, real time all classes combined winner of the 1965 Fastnet, and many others.

 

 

NEW FOR THIS EDITION :

 

On the water

This year, Metric Classes built after the 1906 International Rating (IR) was introduced have been invited to Monaco: 6M, 8M, 12M, and of course the 15M which includes the YCM’s emblematic Tuiga, celebrating her 110th anniversary this year. It is an opportunity to see some great racing, particularly in the popular 6M and 8M classes. The 12M class will be represented by La Spina, a masterpiece of Italian design, and French Kiss, just out of the yard after some restoration work. It was the latter which, in 1987 skippered by Marc Pajot, pulled off the best result to date for a French boat in the America’s Cup by reaching the Challengers’ semi-finals in Perth.

The International Schooner Association has chosen Monaco, after Capri, for the second stage of its all-new Schooner Cup Series. A dozen schooners, including Invader (1905), Puritan (1930) and Elena of London 2009 (1910 replica) will recreate the atmosphere on the quays of yesteryear, when they came to spend the winter in Monaco or watch the Powerboat Meetings in the spring at the turn of the last century.

 

 

Among newcomers of Monaco Classic Week: Atlantic (66m), the famous New York Yacht Club schooner which in 1905 set the record for an Atlantic crossing of 12 days 4 hours 1 minute 19 seconds. Rebuilt at the instigation of Ed Kastelein, an expert in recreating famous sailing yachts, Atlantic is an identical replica of the three-mast schooner Charlie Barr commissioned for the Kaiser’s Cup in May 1905. It was not until 1st August 1980 that a certain Eric Tabarly improved on that time on this 2,925 mile course.

Amidst this prestigious fleet will be 20 entrants from the charming 12’ Dinghy class, with their immaculately varnished hulls and colourful sails, flitting across the water like butterflies.

 

 

Ashore

 

A reminder that quays are open to the public who are free to stroll around the Monaco Classic Week Village of around 20 exhibitors all linked to classic yachts: boatyards, craftsmen, marine painters, sculptors and photographers, with an overall American theme for the decor.

In front of the YCM’s Clubhouse, a one-off G.L. Watson and the America’s Cup exhibition will delight classic yacht fans who for the first time on this side of the Atlantic can find out more about those early boats, which competed in the America’s Cup and established USA supremacy. Set up on Quai Louis II it features unpublished photos from the George Lennox Watson archive, the unlucky Scottish designer behind four British Challengers including a Shamrock for Sir Thomas Lipton. A pioneer of industrial espionage, for each edition of the Cup he obtained photographs of the American boats either in action or in the yard to study them. This unique and historically significant collection has been made available to the yacht Club by G. L. Watson & Co in Liverpool.

 

 

Spectacle accessible to all!

Regularity and manoeuvrability contests for the motorboats, races for the sailing yachts and elegance parades – chaired by S.H.S. The Princess Beatriz de Orléans-Borbón in the presence of S.H.S. The Princess Camilla de Bourbon des Deux-Siciles – are just some of the highlights awaiting spectators. Ashore, chefs on classic yachts vie to produce the most creative original dish in a culinary competition on the quay. For members and participants, the Yacht Club’s decks offer panoramic views of the bay, as does the main harbour wall and other high viewpoints in Monaco for the public.

 

Time to step back in time to relive the passion yachtsmen already had over a century ago and which continues to motivate those who restore, maintain and sail these invaluable testimonies to our maritime heritage.

 

 

Provisional programme (subject to change)

 

Monday 9th & Tuesday 10th September

11.00am                      Start of passage race from Imperia – Monaco

Tuesday 10th September

6.30pm                        Premiere of Movie-lecture MONACO and the Sea (Ballroom)

for YCM members and participants of Monaco Classic Week

Wednesday 11th September

11.00am                      Metric Class races (6 M IR/ 8 M IR/ 12 M IR/ 15 M IR)
11.00am                      Classic yacht races (CIM rating)

7.00pm                        ‘A la rencontre de la Monaco Classic Week’ opening cocktail (by invitation)

with an American serenade by Musique des Equipages de la Flotte

Thursday 12th September
9.00am-6.00pm           Inspection of yachts by “La Belle Classe Restoration” Jury

9.00am-10.00am         Chefs Competition (distribution of ingredients on the quays)
11.00am                      Metric Class races (6 M IR/ 8 M IR/ 12 M IR/ 15 M IR)
11.00am                      Classic yacht races (CIM rating)

11.00am                      Regularity challenge for motorboats
12.30pm                      Picnic at sea for motorboats
5.00pm-7.00pm          Chefs Competition (presentation of dishes on the quays)
8.00pm                        Crew Party (by invitation)

Friday 13th September

9.00am-6.00pm           Inspection of yachts by “La Belle Classe Restoration” Jury

11.00am                      Metric Classes and 12’ Dinghy class races

11.00am                      Classic yacht races (CIM rating)

11.00am                      Manoeuvrability challenge for motorboats

8.30pm                        La Belle Classe party (yachtsman attire, invitation by Moët Hennessy)

Saturday 14th September 

9.00am-6.00pm           Inspection of yachts by “La Belle Classe“ Jury

10.00am                      Elegance parade for Classic yacht

11.00am                      Metric Classes and 12’ Dinghy class races

11.00am                      Classic yacht races (CIM rating)

2.30pm                        Elegance parade for motorboats
8.00pm                        American Night (Great Gatsby dress code, Thirties, by invitation)

Sunday 15th September

12 noon                       Prize-giving (by invitation)

 

 

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Atlantic, the schooner of all records….

Among newcomers this year to Monaco Classic Week is Atlantic, the yacht which in 1905 set a record for an ocean crossing of 12 days and 4 hours. Rebuilt at the instigation of Ed Kastelein, the 64.5m Atlantic is an identical replica of the three-mast schooner that Charlie Barr commissioned for the Kaiser’s Cup in May 1905. Designed by William Gardner, the boat was built by Townsend and Downey (New York) and launched 28th July 1903. It was during a race initiated by Guillaume II,

Emperor of Germany that the Atlantic crossing reference time was set between Sandy Hook and Cape Lizard. The Scottish captain and his 50-strong crew never relaxed for a second, even establishing a record for the longest distance covered under sail of 341 miles in 24 hours on 24th May 1905. It was not until 1st August 1980 that a certain Eric Tabarly improved on that time on this 2,925 mile course.

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SS Delphine: the last big steam yacht

Recognisable by her elegantly inverted bow, slender shape (78.5m long for a beam of 10.83m) and equipped with three boilers powering two 1,500hp quadruple expansion engines, the SS Delphine is the last steam-powered yacht still sailing in her original configuration. She was commissioned by the American automobile magnate Horace E. Dodge and lauched under the first name of his  aughter in  1921 atRiver Rouge,
near Detroit (Michigan). In 1926, she caught fire and sank in New York, but was recovered and restored. She took the billionaire and his family to the Great Lakes, along the East Coast to the  aribbean, Hawaii and Pacific islands. During World War Two, the vessel was requisitioned by the US Navy in 1942. Equipped with canons and renamed the USS Dauntless, she served as the flagship for Admiral Ernest J. King, Commander in Chief of Naval Operations. It was during this period that she was the place to be, hosting US President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill. It is even said that part of the Yalta Agreement would have been negotiated in the cosy comfort of her lounges. At the end of WWII, Horace Dodge’s widow, Anna Dodge, ought her and restored her for civilian use. Her name was changed back to SS Delphine, and in 1997 a Belgium businessman acquired her. It was his daughter, Ineke, who supervised a complete  destoration to her original 1921 condition and configuration, including the interior design and  team engines. She was officially re-christened SS Delphine in 2003 during Monaco Classic Week, with HSH Princess Stephanie of Monaco as the godmother.

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